2011 GeoBee winner.

Isaac N. Ozer an 8th grader from Windham Middle School won the New Hampshire State Geobee and will represent New Hampshire in Washington D.C. at the National Geographic Bee Competition on May 24-25. Fletcher H. Passow, Richmond Middle School,Grade 8, Hanover, NH placed second in a close contest. Anusha T. Murali, a fourth grader from the Shaker Road School in Concord, came in third place. Ozer, Passow and Murali all received DVDs of issues of National Geographic Magazine from 1888 to the present, as well as checks for $100, $75 and $50, respectively. Other finalists were Nisha E. Devasia of Fairgrounds Middle School in Nashua, Daniel W. Taylor of Hampstead Academy, Jessica A. Langlois of Villa Augustina Academy in Goffstown, Max D. Pont of Portsmouth Middle School, Cameron D. Cain of Woodbury School in Salem, Joseph R. Ronca of West Running Brook Middle School in Derry and Ilya Datsko of Hillside Middle School in Manchester. The Keene...

2011 National Geographic Bee

Act now to register your school for the 2011 National Geographic Bee! The Bee is open to schools and homeschool associations with students in grades four through eight. Registration is not open to individual students. Schools that register by October 15, 2010 with the $90 registration fee will receive a contest packet in mid-November that includes all material needed to conduct a school Bee. Schools may register from October 15,2010 through December 10, 2010 for a registration fee of $110. School Bees may be held anytime between November 15, 2010 and January 14, 2011. The school Bee winners complete a written qualifying test that determines the top 100 students in each state. These students are invited to attend their state competition on Friday, April 1, 2011. State winners take part in the national-level competition May 24-25, 2011 in Washington, DC. A minimum of six students from any eligible grade must be physically present and participate in order to have the school level competition. “Virtual” school Bees are not permitted. Questions? Visit www.nationalgeographic.com/geobee or call (202) 828-6659. Return the registration form, or a letter on school letterhead, to: National Geographic Bee c/o National Geographic Society PO Box 98196 Washington, DC...

2010 National Geographic Bee

The final deadline for registration has been extended to December 11, 2009. After October 15, the registration fee increases to $90.   The National Geographic Bee is a school competition for students in any grades four through eight. Excite your students about the world around them and reward those who excel in their knowledge of geography by giving them a chance to compete in a school geographic bee. School level Bees can be held up to January 15, 2010.    Principals must register their schools to receive the contest materials necessary to conduct a school level Bee. All we need is a letter on school letterhead, signed by the principal, with the $70 registration fee ($90 after October 15) (check or purchase order made out to National Geographic).   The registration is not refundable, so make sure the school registers only once. If paying by purchase order, note that when the school sends payment on the PO it must be clear that the check is payment on a PO that was sent earlier so that the school will not be entered twice in the system. Mail the registration letter and fee, in the same envelope, to National Geographic Bee, National Geographic Society, 1145 17th Street, NW, Washington, DC 20036-4688. We look forward to many more schools giving their students the opportunity to excel and also be encouraged to know more about the world in which we live and share, by participating in the National Geographic Bee....

2009 NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC BEE

Texas teen wins geography bee. An ‘educated guess’ in tiebreaker round earns him $25,000 scholarship. WASHINGTON – The nation’s top geography whiz breezed through questions about mountain ranges, rivers and world capitals Wednesday, but he was stumped when National Geographic Bee host Alex Trebek asked him to name one of his weaknesses. “Um …” said Eric Yang, 13, pausing. The Texas teen had just revealed to the “Jeopardy!” host how he crafts his own chess strategies and plays the piano. “That’s OK,” Trebek replied. “You remind me of a former president, but we won’t get into that.” Some in the audience at National Geographic’s headquarters in Washington gasped. Others laughed. But the joke was on Trebek by the end of the hour as Eric took home the top prize of a $25,000 college scholarship, beating out nine other boys in the finals without missing a single answer....